King's 8th Light Coy.

The Light Company of the King's 8th Regiment of Foot has been established as a means through which members of the living history community can develop and share their knowledge, skills and research in a comfortable and welcoming environment. Reenactors, those taking part in this hobby, are welcome to participate and learn what they can from those around them, while contributing for the betterment of all.

Those new to the hobby who are interested in portraying a more progressive side of the Revolutionary War era, will be warmly welcomed and provided with the necessary guidance and resources to participate as full, knowledgeable members of the Light Coy.

Representing the Light Company of the 8th, this group will participate in a variety of events across North America and beyond, though emphasis will be placed on the Great Lakes expeditions and events, covering the historical actions of the Light Coy. and the 8th, at large. 

Hair and Makeup - Part 2 Original and Replica Tool

In today’s post, I will go through some of the beauty tools that I own that help to recreate period hair and makeup. Most of the tools that I own are based on the ones found in Diderot’s Encyclopedia. I have found a few originals, and have tried to replicate others where owning originals aren’t possible.

Diderot's Ecyclopedia, Plate II

Diderot's Ecyclopedia, Plate II

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1 – Toilet Mirror with drawer to store beauty products

2 – Wig scratcher

3 – Clay curlers

4 – Combs (numbers 30 and 31 of Diderot’s Encyclopedia)

5 – Hair pins

 

An original example of a wig scratcher:

A wig wearer's head scratcher, Lot 330 Bonhams

A wig wearer's head scratcher, Lot 330 Bonhams

As well as some original clay wig curlers:

The Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, England

The Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, England

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1 – Papillote iron (numbers 33 and 34 of Diderot’s Encyclopedia)

2 – Toupet iron (Similar to number 23 of Diderot’s Encyclopedia, however  I suspect that this curling iron is from a later time period, but it is interesting nonetheless, so I have decided to include it)

3 – Another variety of curling iron (number 24 and 25 from Diderot’s Encyclopedia)

4 – Curling paper, to be used with the papillote iron (number 10 and 16 and 17 demonstrate how it is used with the iron)

5 – A sample of what it would look like to have the hair wrapped in the paper before using the papillote iron on it

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1 – Face mask for covering the face when powdering the hair (number 42 in Diderot’s Encyclopedia)

2 – Hair rat made from my own hair, which is used to help create tall hairstyles

3 – Wig powder bellows – powder would have been added into the hole under the cork, and it was squeezed like you would a normal set of bellows to “spray” the powder out

4 – Silk powder puff (number 41 of Diderot’s Encyclopedia)

5 – Grey hair powder

6 – Pink hair powder

7 – White hair powder

 

A period image showing how the face mask would have been used to protect the wearer from getting powder on them:

A gentleman being powdered by his valet with a cone to protect his face during the process in ‘The Toilette of the State Prosecutor’s Clerk’, c. 1768 by Carle Vernet.

A gentleman being powdered by his valet with a cone to protect his face during the process in ‘The Toilette of the State Prosecutor’s Clerk’, c. 1768 by Carle Vernet.

I believe the powder puff is a silk one similar to the one that I recreated.

Another original wig powder bellows which appear to have belonged to King George III, dating to approximately 1775. Interestingly this one has an ivory spout.

Image from Kerry Taylor Auctions

Image from Kerry Taylor Auctions

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1 – Beauty patches made out of taffeta and leather in a porcelain patch box

2 – Face paint

3 – Blush

4 – sea sponge for applying the face paint

5 – pomatum

6, 7, 8 – Various decorations that can be used in the hair, such as pearl hairpins, paper flowers and ribbons

© King's 8th Regiment of Foot - Light Company - 2019